tyronegetertyronegeterhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/blogZayd In China]]>https://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/13/Zayd-In-China-1https://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/13/Zayd-In-China-1Tue, 13 Mar 2018 16:50:38 +0000]]>Joe Mcnair on Tyrone Geterhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/07/Joe-Mcnair-on-Tyrone-Get3rhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/07/Joe-Mcnair-on-Tyrone-Get3rWed, 07 Mar 2018 17:53:06 +0000
JOSEPH MCNAIR·TUESDAY, MAY 3, 2016
Maurice Dennis in his definition of Nontraditionism has told us "We should remember that a picture -- before being a war horse, a nude woman, or telling some other story -- is essentially a flat surface covered with colors arranged in a particular pattern."
My friend Tyrone Geter has infused on a stretched canvas, a joy measured by the quality of something rather than its quantity from that experienced in listening to natural sounds, such as the murmur of a stream... Similarly modern painters provide ... artistic sensations due exclusively to the harmony of lights and shades and independent of the subject depicted in the picture. I grew up with Geter during that eternity when he and I spent our formative years in Nigeria sucking up the culture. I remember Tyrone and his wonderful wife Hauwa caring for me when I got sick with Typhoid. They literally moved me into their house and nursed me back to health. I was feverishly hallucinating a lot then.
We fought and argued often on how to represent something, he in his painting, me in my writing. I was a hot headed know it all back then. With my own ideas of how something might be. We argued over the way I was poetically describing one of his creations. I saw a young woman stripped of all her innocence and wanted to portray that as so. He thought I should have more care in how I described Nigerian Women. Even then he was advising that I tend to the scripted lights and shades, independent of the figurative rather than
than sexualizing subjects. I don’t think we ever had that conversation again.
He has grown into his own work, into his own harmony of lights and shades. He is able to feel the beauty of colors and forms, and understands non objective painting. And I have learned, the perception of a work of art is not something that is fixed. It depends as much, if not more, on the period in which the work is being viewed and on our expectations of it as it does on the period in which it was created: that writing has nothing to do with reproduction of nature, nor interpretation of intellectual meanings. He remainsthe most gifted artist I was ever privileged to work with.
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Drawing From The LifeLine]]>Tyrone Geterhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/01/Drawing-From-The-LifeLionehttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/03/01/Drawing-From-The-LifeLioneThu, 01 Mar 2018 21:26:50 +0000
Drawing From The Lifeline: An Artist Abstract
As an artist, I have always been driven by the need to communicate. Becoming a professional artist meant discovering the most efficient method to convey my message to any and all people who would brave the challenges and issues that drive me to create. I love drawing the figure and discovered early in my life that it afforded me the opportunity to talk to other people from our shared humanity. As written by Publius Terentius (c. 195/185 – c. 159 BC), playwright and once enslaved African, “I am human, nothing human is alien to me."
George Wallace, Alabama was not an ideal birthplace for traveling the path to an artistic career. The only influences I was afforded was my sister copying a magazine image of a woman with the instruction “Draw Me” written beneath it. Creatively hungry, I did as the photo instructed. I drew. I later meet and was greatly influenced by a family friend who studied Art Education at Miles College. My desire to be a part of a creative environment was born.
Being fascinated by the human form, I have tried for many years to understand its nature as well as its anatomical makeup. Throughout my career, the human form has been the mechanism that makes it possible for me to speak my truth about my life, beliefs, and the varied and colorful histories of my people. Early in my career, I believed that the more realistic the style and technique, the more significant and profound the statement; that the ability to communicate experiences was greatly improved by a well-rendered figure. Nigeria changed that notion.
Living in Africa from 1979 – 1987 profoundly transformed my life and work. The richness, color, and complexities of the Nigeria’s people and cultures showed me that creative interpretation combined with relevant ideas were also important factors. I began to push the personal limits of my approach to the figure, exploring the use of multiple lines that have always been a natural outgrowth of my drawings. The boundaries of realistic interpretation began to morph and expand freeing me to create at a new and exciting level. I moved from the influence of the pure geometric shapes of Islamic art and began using and adapting torn paper as a free hanging collage element as well as incorporating overlapping edges to create motion and mixed media.
Drawing From The Lifeline is the culmination of many influences and years of study. Its themes originate from an earlier concept, Purgatory Ain’t Nothin’ But The Blues. In my work, “purgatory” is defined as a concept that carries emotional weight that is generational in scope rather than functioning as a traditional religious doctrine or belief. It is analogues to the crushing, over-powering reality of the blues of which there are many — the “I ain’t got me no money blues,” “my baby done gone and left me blues”, “another man done gone blues”, “I need a job blues.” As BB King so eloquently put it "If you ever been mistreated, then you know just what I'm talking about.” The “purgatory of the blues” is ever present and speaks to the human condition.
Purgatory Ain’t Nothin’ But The Blues uses all aspects of African and African American life and culture as themes for the subject it explores. Series within the Purgatory collection include Black Face; Black Works; Dark Angels; Survival; Mask; Ghetto Angel; Ain’t I A Woman and Living In The Light Of Hell’s Shadow, to name a few.
Studying and painting the figure has given me the tools to created the rich, textured world that I see and imagine beyond my windows. I thrill at how the body wears the joys, the blues and history of its interior. I strive to show our strengths, our value as humans and to restore the dignity that is so often stripped from us. My life long goal is to depict our lives and bodies as grand monuments of something other, and much more, than their suffering.
Tyrone Geter
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Ain't I A Woman]]>https://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/02/17/Aint-I-A-Womanhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/02/17/Aint-I-A-WomanSat, 17 Feb 2018 17:27:20 +0000
By: Sojourner Truth
Delivered 1851 at the Women's Convention, Akron, Ohio
Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?
That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ain't I a woman? Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman? I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman? I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?
Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?
Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.
If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back , and get it right side up again! And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.
Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.
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Let Me Explain Myself]]>https://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/01/29/Let-Me-Explain-Myselfhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2018/01/29/Let-Me-Explain-MyselfMon, 29 Jan 2018 21:57:09 +0000
As an artist, I have always been driven by the need to communicate. Becoming a professional artist meant discovering the most efficient method to convey my message to any and all people who would brave the challenges and issues that drive me to create. I love drawing the figure and discovered early in my life that it gave me the opportunity to talk to other people from our shared humanity. As written by Publius Terentius (c. 195/185 – c. 159 BC), playwright and once enslaved African, "I am human, nothing human is alien to me." George Wallace Alabama was not an ideal birthplace for traveling the path to an artistic career. The only influences I was afforded was my sister copying a magazine image of a woman with the instruction "Draw Me" written beneath it. Creatively hungry, I did as the photo instructed. I drew. I later meet and was greatly influenced by a family friend who studied Art Education at Miles College. My desire to be a part of a creative environment was born. Being fascinated by the human form, I have tried for many years to understand its nature as well as its anatomical makeup. Throughout my career, the human form has been the mechanism that makes it possible for me to speak my truth about my life, beliefs, and the varied and colorful histories of my people. Early in my career, I believed that the more realistic the style and technique, the more significant and profound the statement; that the ability to communicate experiences was greatly improved by a well-rendered figure. Nigeria changed that notion. Living in Africa from 1979 – 1987 profoundly transformed my life and work. The richness, color, and complexities of the Nigeria's people and cultures showed me that creative interpretation combined with relevant ideas were also important factors. I began to push the personal limits of my approach to the figure, exploring the use of multiple lines that have always been a natural outgrowth of my drawings. The boundaries of realistic interpretation began to morph and expand freeing me to create at a new and exciting level. I moved from the influence of the pure geometric shapes of Islamic art and began using and adapting torn paper as a free hanging collage element as well as incorporating overlapping edges to create motion and mixed media. Drawing From The Lifeline is the culmination of many influences and years of study. Its themes originate from an earlier concept, Purgatory Ain't Nothin' But The Blues. In my work, "purgatory" is defined as a concept that carries emotional weight that is generational in scope rather than functioning as a traditional religious doctrine or belief. It is analogues to the crushing, over-powering reality of the blues of which there are many — the "I ain't got me no money blues," "my baby done gone and left me blues", "another man done gone blues", "I need a job blues." As BB King so eloquently put it "If you ever been mistreated, then you know just what I'm talking about." The "purgatory of the blues" is ever present and speaks to the human condition. Purgatory Ain't Nothin' But The Blues uses all aspects of African and African American life and culture as themes for the subject it explores. Series within the Purgatory collection include Black Face; Black Works; Dark Angels; Survival; Mask; Ghetto Angel; Ain't I A Woman and Living In The Light Of Hell's Shadow, to name a few. Tyrone Geter
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I don old. I don tired but I ain't no ways done.]]>https://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2016/05/03/Modern-minimalism-one-artists-journeyhttps://www.tyronegeter.com/single-post/2016/05/03/Modern-minimalism-one-artists-journeyTue, 03 May 2016 14:35:00 +0000
From the Collection of The Columbia Museum Of Art Narrated by Will South, chief curator, Columbia Museum.