God's Playground

As a young boy growing up in Anniston, Alabama, when it thundered my grandmother would hush us towards the couch and make us sit on our hands. She would tell us to be quiet because "god was working." Like many children of the South, faith was often brought up in times of fear or condemnation. But through the poverty and the discrimination of George Wallace's Alabama, church was also a time of celebration, a time when families and communities came together for births, weddings, comfort, and good food. "God's Playground" explores the celebratory place faith plays unconsciously or consciously  in African American communities. So much of America believes in the afterlife, and "God's playground" attempts to display the best in us.

As a young boy growing up in Anniston, Alabama, when it thundered my grandmother would hush us towards the couch and make us sit on our hands. She would tell us to be quiet because "god was working." Like many children of the South, faith was often brought up in times of fear or condemnation. But through the poverty and the discrimination of George Wallace's Alabama, church was also a time of celebration, a time when families and communities came together for births, weddings, comfort, and good food. "God's Playground" explores the celebratory place faith plays unconsciously or consciously  in African American communities. So much of America believes in the afterlife, and "God's playground" attempts to display the best in us.